The Last Unicorn – a review (spoiler-free)


The Last Unicorn

I just finished The Last Unicorn, by Peter S. Beagle a couple of days ago and what a beautifully written book. I had long heard about it and Rothfuss never stops talking about it, so I just had to give it a shot.

There are tons of well-penned sentences in this piece. Beagle creates a world that I just fell in love with and wanted to know more about. The characters are likable and they all want something, which makes you (the reader) want something for them (or you don’t want them to have it).

This is a book that makes you believe in unicorns, if you already didn’t. If you already did, well, you’ll just be believing in them more, or cutting your own wrists because you knew they were real, but still have yet to see one. Well, have you seen any white mares?

I think outside of the tale itself, the story of the author’s writing it and some of the events that led to the book’s release and popularity were pretty interesting. When I got home last night, Kerrie and I watched the 1982 animated film of the same title, for which Beagle also wrote the screenplay. Animation aside, I thought it was a movie that stayed closer to any movie’s original book story than any film I can remember.  It was short, but good.

I’m impressed that he wrote it at 24, but that’s what you do when you lock yourself in a room for a week straight.

Recommendations? Yes. The answer is yes, I recommend it. It’s a short book, and depending on how quickly you read and how invested you are with the story, you could probably read it between three and seven days. For the ultra fast readers, it will take you just an afternoon.

For those of you who didn’t know, he wrote a short story, “Two Hearts” which was a sequel (or had sequel elements) to The Last Unicorn. It won a Hugo award.

If you’re into fantasy, it’s something that would fit nicely on your shelves.

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